Tag Archives: pro-family

Pro-family??? Arkansas’s new anti-gay law is anti-children

Pro-family: adj. Favoring or supporting values held to promote “traditional” (whatever that is…) family life, typically values identified with social conservatismsuch as opposition to abortion (and often contraception), homosexuality, gay marriage, and anyone that doesn’t seem “Biblically correct.”

So those of us who are more flexible in our definition of what constitutes a family must be anti-family.

I don’t know how wretched people like me ever managed to raise happy healthy well-educated responsible kids! I’m not gay, but in every other regard I am the embodiment of evil.

I wrote about the sad passage of Prop 8 in California which (thanks to the Mormons and Catholics) now forbids gays from marrying. But today I read something even sadder – Proposition 1 that just passed in Arkansas forbidding people who are “cohabitating outside a valid marriage” from serving as foster parents or adopting children.

As Dan Savage wrote in a column today:

While the measure bans both gay and straight members of cohabitating couples as foster or adoptive parents, the Arkansas Family Council wrote it expressly to thwart “the gay agenda.”

Right now, there are 3,700 other children across Arkansas in state custody; 1,000 of them are available for adoption. The overwhelming majority of these children have been abused, neglected or abandoned by their heterosexual parents.

Even before the law passed, the state estimated that it had only about a quarter of the foster parents it needed. Beginning on Jan. 1, a grandmother in Arkansas cohabitating with her opposite-sex partner because marrying might reduce their pension benefits is barred from taking in her own grandchild; a gay man living with his male partner cannot adopt his deceased sister’s children.

Social conservatives are threatening to roll out Arkansas-style adoption bans in other states. And the timing couldn’t be worse: in tough economic times, the numbers of abused and neglected children in need of foster care rises. But good times or bad, no movement that would turn away qualified parents and condemn children to a broken foster care system should be considered “pro-family.”

Have these people no heart? These people care about children? These are good Christians?
This “pro-family movement” is a movement that must be stopped.

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